2018 NFL free agents: Dolphins give no assurances that Jarvis Landry returns

Dolphins VP Mike Tannenbaum has a busy offseason. (Allen Eyestone/The Post)

MOBILE, Ala.—The Dolphins aren’t doing anything publicly to quell some of the negativity that’s surfaced between them and Jarvis Landry, but they aren’t oozing optimism that he’ll be back, either.

Miami executive vice president Mike Tannenbaum spoke positively of Landry at the Senior Bowl this afternoon and reiterated the team’s desire to keep young talent in the building. He also mentioned that won’t be possible with every player.

“Jarvis is a pending free agent,” Tannenbaum said when asked where negotiations stand. “We have a lot of respect for him. He was drafted here, developed here, coached here. He’s obviously had very good production. In terms of negotiations, that’s something we wouldn’t comment on with any of our players.

“He’s one of several free agents—Damien Williams, Matt Moore, guys that have contributed here for a long time. I’m sure we’re going to keep some of them. We can’t keep all of them. That’s just the nature of our sport. There’s still some time before the upcoming deadlines.”

The first day teams can place the franchise or transition tag on a player is Feb. 20, and the legal tampering portion of free agency starts March 12.

Prior to this offseason, there was little indication of any discontent between Landry and the organization. Coach Adam Gase has called him the best offensive player on the team and has reassured him of his value to the team on multiple occasions when trade rumors surfaced.

Last offseason, when the Dolphins gave extensions to or re-signed several players but did not hammer out an extension for Landry that would’ve avoided this situation, Landry never raised an issue publicly. He attended every session of Organized Team Activities and minicamp and reported on time to training camp. The idea of a holdout was never an option.

“I know I’m the leader of this team,” he said in August. “And for me to get this team to where we need to be, I have to be here.”

In November, shortly after the team dealt Jay Ajayi to Philadelphia and held on to Landry amid rumors that he was available to be had, Gase reiterated how important he was to the team’s future.

“We have a vision for what we want that wide receiver room to look like and we expect him to be a huge part of that,” he said while clarifying that Tannenbaum is the one who handles contracts.

Just as he did in his update on the Landry talks, Tannenbaum gave a vague answer on how the relationship between management and player has gone during Landry’s four years with Miami.

“He’s a Dolphin, he was drafted here, he’s been productive,” he said. “Adam has used him, and he’s produced and gotten better. We want sustainability and we want to keep as many of our own players within reason—draft and develop them—but again, you can’t keep them all. That’s just part of the system that we all live in.”

Landry has repeatedly said he wants to remain with the Dolphins, who drafted him in the second round in 2014, but at the end of this season he acknowledged he is open to signing elsewhere if the offer isn’t right.

Ascertaining his market value is difficult because he has the production of a No. 1 receiver but puts up those numbers out of the slot.

The most recent receivers to sign a big contracts were Green Bay’s Davante Adams (four years, $58 million) and Pittsburgh’s Antonio Brown (four years, $68 million). Adams was chosen 10 spots ahead of Landry in the same draft class, is well behind him in catches and yards and has four more touchdown catches. Brown came into the league in 2010 and has been an all-pro selection four straight years.

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