Tom Brady for 6-7 more years? ‘Great’ says Miami Dolphins’ Adam Gase

New England Patriots QB Tom Brady plays in the Super Bowl often. (AP Photo/Gregory Payan)

PHOENIX — The owner of the New England Patriots, a man named Robert Kraft, said this week that his quarterback, a man named Tom Brady, may play another six or seven years.

Perhaps you’ve heard of these two.

They win a lot. And Miami hasn’t won nearly enough since Brady’s arrival in Boston.

The Dolphins must spend a lot of time thinking about what the Patriots have done and how they can close the gap, and likely, when that darn Brady will finally retire.

So to hear this week that Brady, a man about to turn 40, may play forever – OK, maybe not forever – must have been frustrating for the good folks from South Florida.

Not so fast, my friend.

Dolphins coach Adam Gase doesn’t back down from a challenge. Even the best-looking, best-passing man on the planet. OK, so, the NFL.

“If he can play that long, that’s great,” Gase said, after an uncharacteristically long pause at a breakfast gathering with reporters Tuesday morning. “I mean, he’s great for the league.”

What Gase said next is the best part.

“And I think that our organization, we can’t be an organization to run and hide,” he said.

We won’t run and hide from Robert Kraft, or Bill Belichick, or Tom Brady, or anyone, Gase may have well implied. This man has moxie. This man understands that as Tony Robbins might say, “You gotta believe, with all your heart and soul, that you can and will beat the Patriots, before you beat the Patriots.”

Or, something like that.

Back to Gase.

“We should want to go against the best team, every year,” he said. “And the fact that they’re in our division, we should look at that as a great challenge. And that’s what we’re trying to do. We know that our goal has to be to win the division. Because we know if we do that then that means we’re probably pretty good.”

For the record, the man nicknamed Tom Terrific or Touchdown Tom or The Pharoah (really, The Pharoah?) is 20-9 against the Miami Dolphins in his career, with 52 touchdowns and 21 interceptions.

He’ll retire. Eventually. We think.

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Adam Gase says Miami Dolphins ‘played like crap’ against New England, Pittsburgh

Miami Dolphins head coach Adam Gase speaks during a news conference at the NFL football scouting combine Thursday, March 2, 2017, in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

INDIANAPOLIS — While most coaches and executives in the NFL try at all costs to avoid comparisons to New England, Miami Dolphins coach Adam Gase candidly admits a late-season, home blowout loss to the Patriots delivered a clear message.

(Photo credit: Miami Dolphins coach Adam Gase speaks at the NFL Scouting Combine. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

“New England showed us exactly how far away we were,” Gase said at the NFL Scouting Combine.

Gase declined multiple opportunities to assess the 2016 Dolphins season as an overall success, despite having had some time to process the way a 10-5 season ended at 10-6, following bad losses to New England and Pittsburgh.

“I’d love to be able to say that, 100 percent, but those last two are who we are,” Gase said. “We played like crap in those two games.”

Gase’s honesty is one of his best attributes. Among his goals are to shoot it straight with players, coaches and the media. And so yes, the way Miami’s season ended still bothers Gase.

As if extra motivation was needed.

“It still stings a little bit,” Gase said. “It’s hard to get over the last game. Every time you’re watching cut-ups and something comes up and you see the chances you had here and there, it still bothers you. I thought the guys fought … we had guys that battled.”

Gase knows the Dolphins must improve in run defense, must add more skill and depth at defensive end and linebacker and add a starting-caliber safety, all through free agency and the draft.

“We’ve got a long ways to go and we’ve got to make sure that we develop this offseason and put ourselves in position the next season if we are able to get to the playoffs and we get another opportunity like that that we’re ready to go,” Gase said.

Gase believes having veterans like safety Reshad Jones return from injury will have a positive impact.

But Gase isn’t fooled by the unexpected 10-win season and playoff berth. The Dolphins are not yet within striking distance of championship conversation.

And Gase, candidly, refused to conclude the 2016 season was a satisfying.

“No,” he said.

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Check out The Palm Beach Post‘s Miami Dolphins page on Facebook.

 

 

Bad news, Miami Dolphins fans: Tom Brady plans to play for “long time”

Tom Brady tears up while celebrating after the New England Patriots' unprecedented overtime comeback victory against the Atlanta Falcons in Super Bowl LI, at NRG Stadium in Houston, Feb. 5, 2017. He was not the Brady everyone knew in the first half, spraying passes and missing receivers, and a large swath of America was reveling in it. Then, in the second half, fans saw the very thing they hope to see whenever they tune in to sports. (Doug Mills/The New York Times)
Tom Brady tears up while celebrating after the New England Patriots’ victory against the Atlanta Falcons in Super Bowl LI, at NRG Stadium in Houston, Feb. 5, 2017.  (Doug Mills/The New York Times)

Tom Brady turns 40 in August and Miami Dolphins fans would like to believe at some point their torture will end.

Guess not.

Brady, the New England Patriots quarterback with five super Bowl rings, told Sirus XM NFL Radio with Jim Miller that “I still plan on playing for a long time.”

Great. A long time???  

“If it was up to my wife she would have me retire today,” Brady said. “She told me that last night three times.  And I said, ‘Too bad, babe, I’m having too much fun right now.’  You know, I feel like I can still do it and if you love what you do and you’re capable of doing it then, I mean I’d be so bored if I wasn’t going out there, knowing that I could still do it.  So I’m going to work hard to be ready to go and I still plan on playing for a long time.”

The Miami Dolphins have floundered since Brady became New England’s starting quarterback in his second NFL season, 2001.

This is from a recent Daily Dolphin post outlining all the annoying ways the Dolphins were connected to a Super Bowl in which they were not participating:

“Brady is 20-9 all-time against the Miami Dolphins, completing 61 percent of passes with 52 touchdowns and 21 interceptions and a passer rating of 91.7. Against the Dolphins, Brady has actually performed below his career average of 97.2. So there are plenty of years left and plenty of room to improve. Curse? The Dolphins have not won a playoff game in the 16 seasons Brady has been a Patriots’ starter.”

So how much longer can Brady realistically play? (As an aside, this reminds me of the era when the New York Knicks knew they basically had no chance to win the Eastern Conference until Michael Jordan retired. Then he did and they did, under Pat Riley.)

Back to Brady.

Here is how old some of the NFL’s greatest passers were when they began their final NFL season:

Peyton Manning: 39

Brett Favre: 41

Dan Marino: 38

John Elway: 38

Warren Moon: 42

Fran Tarkenton: 38

Vinny Testaverde: 44

Drew Bledsoe: 34

Joe Montana: 38

Common sense says Brady can play two or maybe three more years at the high standard he’s set for himself.

Anything beyond that would be super-human.

Brady is human, right?

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Since Tom Brady, here’s every 199th overall NFL Draft Pick

Fans’ travel guide to see Miami Dolphins’ Jason Taylor enter Hall of Fame

 

Check out The Palm Beach Post‘s Miami Dolphins page on Facebook.

Since Tom Brady, here’s every 199th overall NFL Draft Pick

New England Patriots QB Tom Brady #12 in action against the Atlanta Falcons at Super Bowl 51 on Sunday, February 5, 2017 in Houston, TX. (AP Photo/Gregory Payan)
New England Patriots QB Tom Brady in action against the Atlanta Falcons at Super Bowl 51 in Houston, TX. Brady, once the 199th overall draft choice, won again. (AP Photo/Gregory Payan)

Miami Dolphins wide receiver Kenny Stills wondered on Twitter Sunday night if Tom Brady is the NFL’s Michael Jordan.

Meanwhile, Dolphins safety Isa Abdul-Quddus saw no reason to debate: he proclaimed Brady the greatest of all time.

One thing is certain: the greatest draft choice in NFL history came in 2000, when New England selected Tom Brady of Michigan with the 199th overall pick, in the sixth round of the NFL Draft.

How great a choice was it?

Take a look at the players selected 199th overall since 2001.

(If you’re wondering, with the first pick in the sixth round of the 2000 NFL Draft, the Miami Dolphins selected defensive tackle Ernest Grant of Arkansas-Pine Bluff. Grant played 24 NFL games, with 18 tackles and 0.5 sacks.)

This is a photo of Ernest Grant celebrating (not as easy to find as #12, you know…)

12022001 Pro Player Stadium.... Miami Dolphins vs Denver Broncos... Dolphins #97 Ernest Grant celebrates as teammate Kenny Mixon returns an interception for a touchdown in the fourth quarter to give the Dolphins a 14-10 lead. Broncos #62 Dan Neil gets up off the turf. Staff photo by Allen Eyestone
At Pro Player Stadium in 2001, Miami Dolphins defensive tackle Ernest Grant celebrates as teammate Kenny Mixon returns an interception for a touchdown (Staff photo Allen Eyestone)

While everyone waits for Tom Brady to get old and retire, he has suggested he feels great and has got plenty left.

The Dolphins haven’t won a single playoff game since Brady took over as New England’s quarterback.

So, great.

10072001 MIAMI DOLPHINS VS. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS / PRO PLAYER STADIUM........Dolphins defender Jason Taylor sacks New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady towards the close of the first half of play. PHOTO BY DAMON HIGGINS/THE PALM BEACH POST
In this photo take in 2001, Miami Dolphins defensive end Jason Taylor sacks New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady. The Dolphins won as Brady passed for only 86 yards and was sacked four times. It’s been downhill for Miami since. (PHOTO BY DAMON HIGGINS/THE PALM BEACH POST)

Everyone seeks their own Tom Brady, as unlikely now as they are to find one in the sixth round.

Since 2000, here’s what teams have done the 199th overall selection:

2000: New England Patriots — Tom Brady, QB, Michigan; 5 Super Bowl rings, 2 NFL MVP, 12 Pro Bowls

2001: Tennessee Titans — Adam Haayer, OT, Minnesota; 20 career games

2002: Chicago Bears — Adrian Peterson, RB, Georgia Southern; 1,283 career rushing yards

2003: NY Giants — Willie Ponder, WR, SE Missouri St.; 122 career KO returns

2004: Baltimore Ravens — Clarence Moore, WR, Northern Arizona; 29 career catches

2005: Kansas City Chiefs — Khari Long, DE, Baylor, 1 career game

2006: Indianapolis Colts — Charlie Johnson, OT, Oklahoma State; 134 career games

2007: Miami Dolphins — Drew Mormino, C, Central Michigan; no stats

2008: NY Giants — Robert Henderson, DE, Southern Miss; no stats

2009: Oakland Raiders — Stryker Sulak, DE, Missouri; no stats

2010: Minnesota Vikings — Joe Webb, WR, Alabama-Birmingham; 8 career catches

2011: Kansas City Chiefs — Jerrell Powe, DT, Ole Miss; 12 career tackles

2012: San Francisco 49ers — Jason Slowey, OL, Western Oregon; no stats

2013: Detroit Lions — Theo Riddick, RB, Notre Dame; 1,410 receiving yards

2014: Seattle Seahawks — Garrett Scott, OL, Marshall; no stats

2015: Pittsburgh Steelers — Leterrius Walton, DT, Central Michigan; 6 career tackles

2016: Cincinnati Bengals — Cody Ware, WR, Ole Miss; 17 career catches

https://twitter.com/iamisa1/status/828445346175008768

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NFL: Concussion Protocol not followed correctly with Dolphins QB Matt Moore

Matt Moore got rocked by Bud Dupree and was back in the game two plays later. (Getty Images)
Matt Moore got rocked by Bud Dupree and was back in the game two plays later. (Getty Images)

MOBILE, Ala.–Dolphins quarterback Matt Moore did not suffer a concussion in the team’s playoff game against Pittsburgh, but the NFL and NFLPA determined that the team did not fully follow the Concussion Protocol before sending him back into the game two plays later.

Moore took a shot to the helmet from the Steelers’ Bud Dupree and hit the back of his head hard on the ground when he fell. The primary issue with Miami allowing him to return was that the medical staff did not recognize that he was bleeding from the mouth.
Continue reading “NFL: Concussion Protocol not followed correctly with Dolphins QB Matt Moore”

A little candy to treat Dolphins fans sick of seeing Patriots in Super Bowl again

This time of year can be tough on Miami Dolphins fans, now 43 years removed from

1973 file photo. Don Shula.

Don Shula in 1973. (Post file photo)

the last NFL championship in franchise history, and that frustration goes double when the New England Patriots are back in the Super Bowl again.

As a public service to the South Florida market we offer these proofs that it was not always this way (Patriots ruling the AFC East and, too frequently, the world) and it will not stay this way forever (in theory, at least).

  • Between 1964-75, the Boston/New England Patriots experienced a 12-season postseason drought. The Dolphins’ longest stretch without a playoff game is seven seasons.
  • During the sad period of Patriots history listed above, the Dolphins won a couple of Super Bowls, posted the only perfect season in NFL history and ran up a 13-6 record against the Pats.
  • Between 1963-82, the Patriots qualified for just four playoff games and lost them all. The last loss in that string was a first-rounder to Miami in 1982, and the Dolphins went on to play in the Super Bowl that year.
  • The Dolphins are 16 years without a postseason victory at the moment, but there’s still time to put one on the board before reaching the Patriots’ franchise worst drought of 21 years between 1964-84.
  • Three times in their history the Patriots have owned or shared the worst record in the NFL – 1970, 1990 and 1992. That has happened to Miami only once (2007).
  • The Dolphins lead the all-time series with the Patriots 53-50, playoffs included.
  • The Dolphins own the longest winning streak in the series, with nine straight victories over the Patriots between 1989-93. The Patriots have never won more than seven in a row against Miami.
  • The Dolphins have the most lopsided victory in the series, 52-0 in 1972.
  • When Tom Brady joines the Pro Football Hall of Fame one day, he’ll still be outnumbered by Bob Griese and Dan Marino.
  • Bill Belichick may have 262 career victories but he’s still 85 short of Don Shula.

 

Conclusions? This makes me feel a little bit better about the faulty concept that everything always goes New England’s way, and a little bit worse that it took so much work to find these Miami advantages.

Trust me, it does no good to dig further. Stop here, before counting up division titles, Super Bowls and such, and before recognizing that Shula was 65 when the Dolphins pushed him out of the way for Jimmy Johnson. Belichick is 64 and still working on his trophy case.

[Here’s a Miami Heat upset crazier than Monday’s win over Warriors]

[Gators fall a touchdown short of college football’s scoring average]

[Wondering if Dolphins’ No. 22 draft slot is haunted]

It’s not your imagination: Blowouts making these NFL playoffs unwatchable

Tom Brady of the New England Patriots celebrates after defeating the Pittsburgh Steelers 36-17 to win the AFC Championship Game at Gillette Stadium on January 22, 2017 in Foxboro, Mass. (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
Tom Brady of the New England Patriots celebrates after blowing out the Pittsburgh Steelers 36-17 in the AFC Championship Game at Gillette Stadium on January 22, 2017 in Foxboro, Mass. (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)

It’s not your imagination.

There’s a good reason you may have been dabbling on social media or cleaning the house or doing anything but devoting undivided attention to these NFL playoffs.

They’ve been unwatchable.

Ten playoff games are in the books and the average margin of victory has been a whopping 15.7 points. If you thought the Dolphins’ 30-12 wild-card loss to Pittsburgh was bad, consider that nearly half the other playoff games — 44 percent — have been even bigger blowouts.

It’s not supposed to work this way.

You have to go back to the 2002 season to find a postseason so devoid of drama. The average margin that year was 17.1.

More typical: Five times since 2006, the average playoff margin was in single digits. Plus, in 2003, seven of the 11 postseason games were one-score affairs, three went into overtime and the Super Bowl finished at New England 32, Carolina 29.

Accentuating the snoozeability of these playoffs is that over the previous three seasons, the average victory margin held steady at 11.2 to 11.5 points. Never in that period was there fewer than five one-score games.

To be fair, last Sunday’s divisional games included an instant classic (Green Bay’s 34-31 victory over Dallas) and a down-to-the-wire affair (Pittsburgh 18, Kansas City 16) — the only one-score games of this postseason.

Then again, if you’re a fan of the New England Patriots or Atlanta Falcons, you’re not complaining.

            Avg.  1-score     OT

           margin games   games

2016    15.7     2            0

2015    11.5     7            1

2014    11.5     5            1

2013    11.2     6            0

2012    9.0       5            1

2011    12.6     6            2

2010    9.5       8            0

2009    15.2     3            2

2008    9.8       5            0

2007    9.1       5            1

2006    9.0       6            1

2005    13.8     3            0

2004    13.3     4            2

2003    9.3       7            3

2002    17.1     3            1

2001    12.7     4            1

2000    17.7     2            1

Dallas Cowboys, Super Bowl champs tattoo? Is this guy a comedian? (Actually, he is)

Images of the tattoo, prominently displayed, in all of its ridiculousness.
Jordan Garnett, a stand-up comedian from Boynton Beach, shows off his newly inaccurate Dallas Cowboys tattoo. (Damon Higgins / The Palm Beach Post)

The playoff loss by his beloved Dallas Cowboys is going to stay with Jordan Garnett awhile.

Permanently, actually.

Garnett, a 24-year-old stand-up comedian from Boynton Beach, was so sure the Cowboys were going to win the Super Bowl this season that last month, he put it down in ink — on his right biceps.

“Super Bowl LI champions,” reads his tattoo, accompanied by the Cowboys’ ubiquitous star logo.

The Green Bay Packers celebrate their 34-31 win over the Dallas Cowboys in the NFL Divisional Playoff game on Sunday. (Brandon Wade/Fort Worth Star-Telegram/TNS)
The Green Bay Packers celebrate their 34-31 win over the Dallas Cowboys in the NFL Divisional Playoff game on Sunday. (Brandon Wade/Fort Worth Star-Telegram/TNS)

Faster than you can say “How ‘bout dem Packers!”, Garnett’s hopes were erased Sunday night when Green Bay eliminated the Cowboys in a 34-31 playoff classic.

“I cried my eyes out last night,” Garnett said Monday.

Unfortunately, those tears did nothing to wash away a tattoo that’s drenched in irony.

For starters: “I actually really don’t like tattoos that much,” Garnett said. “I always said I would never get one.”

And: The tattoo was paid for by a New York Giants fan who tried to talk him out of it at the last minute.

If by now you’re picturing Garnett as a prime candidate for one of those “football vs. life” commercials featuring ex-Steelers coach Bill Cowher, hang on. There’s more.

Garnett said the Super Bowl Host Committee in Houston, site of this season’s title game, promised four free tickets if the Cowboys made it. He also had commercial deals lined up.

On the plus side, Garnett does have an important stand-up gig on the horizon.

In Wisconsin. Packers country.

“I definitely will show the tattoo,” Garnett said. “They’ll love it.”

Garnett might not have to tell any jokes, the Cheeseheads will find it so amusing.

Garnett credits his father with turning him into a Cowboys fan in 1999. He got the star tattooed on his arm a handful of years ago, but it wasn’t until last month, amid Dallas’ 13-3 regular-season run, that Garnett had an inkling he should visit the tattoo parlor and — we can’t resist — go out on a limb.

Things looked really bad when Green Bay stormed to a 21-3 lead. Things looked pretty good when the Cowboys rallied for a 31-31 tie in the dying seconds, seemingly to force overtime. Then, Aaron Rodgers hit an improbable 36-yard pass to Jared Cook to set up Mason Crosby’s winning 51-yard field goal on the final play — an ending so dramatic, NFL Network planned to air the game again Monday night.

Jordan Garnett, a stand-up comedian from Boynton Beach, shows off his newly inaccurate Dallas Cowboys tattoo. (Damon Higgins / The Palm Beach Post)
Jordan Garnett, a stand-up comedian from Boynton Beach, shows off his newly inaccurate Dallas Cowboys tattoo. (Damon Higgins / The Palm Beach Post)

One man’s instant classic is another man’s Bawlers.

At least Garnett took a sporting approach to the whole thing, which is more than he can say about some middle school kids who he says have bombarded him with death threats, apparently thinking he jinxed Dallas.

“These kids are mean,” he said.

As for Garnett, he has until this weekend to come up with self-deprecating jokes for his appearance at The Improv in West Palm Beach. He’s also doing his podcast at 8 p.m. Tuesday, which will have a live stream on weinetwork.com and include a guest: a tattoo artist.

Garnett is adding an extra ‘I’ to his tattoo so it will read “Super Bowl LII champions” — an early prediction for the the 2018 Super Bowl in Minnesota.

“Obviously, I’m not that great with guarantees,” he said. “But I’ll guarantee it again: We’ll win it next year.”

If that fails, he has another fall-back: Super Bowl LIII in Atlanta.

After that, problems. The 2020 title game will be at Hard Rock Stadium.

That’s Super Bowl LIV.

Ex-linebackers coach Matt Burke named Miami Dolphins defensive coordinator

Will the Miami Dolphins move Laremy Tunsil to left tackle in 2017?

Miami Dolphins lose defensive coordinator Vance Joseph to Denver Broncos

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Check out The Palm Beach Post‘s Miami Dolphins page on Facebook.

Celebrating is more egregious than hit on Miami Dolphins’ Matt Moore? Really, NFL?

Pittsburgh Steelers outside linebacker Bud Dupree (48) hits Miami Dolphins quarterback Matt Moore (8) during the first half of an AFC Wild Card NFL football game in Pittsburgh, Sunday, Jan. 8, 2017. Moore remained in the game. (AP Photo/Fred Vuich)
Pittsburgh Steelers outside linebacker Bud Dupree (48) hits Miami Dolphins quarterback Matt Moore (8) during the first half of an AFC Wild Card NFL football game in Pittsburgh, Sunday, Jan. 8, 2017. Moore remained in the game. (AP Photo/Fred Vuich)

Earlier this month, the NFL fined Dolphins receiver Jarvis Landry $24,309 for removing his helmet to celebrate a touchdown.

Friday, the NFL will announce it’s fining Steelers linebacker Bud Dupree $18,231 for attempting to remove Matt Moore’s helmet — with Matt Moore’s head inside it.

And if you want to know all about the NFL’s commitment to player safety, keep in mind $6,078 — the difference between the two fines.

Today, Dolphins fans are questioning the NFL’s logic. Rightly so. Landry’s act was harmful to no one, other than the helmet he smashed on the ground to release pent-up frustration.

Matt Moore missed one play before returning from this. (Getty Images)
Matt Moore missed one play before returning from this. (Getty Images)

That Dupree’s act did not cause a concussion to Moore was a minor miracle to all who witnessed it. The crown of Dupree’s helmet crashed into Moore’s jaw as Moore released his pass. For this to happen, Dupree had to lower his head before impact, the cardinal sin of tackling because it puts both players at risk.

Ironically, just as Dupree’s fine had been leaked to ESPN, a news release hit my inbox from the league, a reminder of the concussion protocol laid out this past summer. “Furthering their commitment to protecting the health and safety of NFL players … ,” it began.

So how is one act worth $24,309 and the other $18,231? Simple. Landry’s act struck at the heart of the reputation the NFL strives for, Dupree’s, maybe not as much.

Take a look at examples of the NFL’s fine schedule, keeping in mind most of the figures below are minimums:


Physical contact with an official $30,387

Fighting                                                                          $30,387

Verbal or non-physical abuse vs. official                 $24,309

Spearing                                                                          $24,309

Impermissible use of helmet including launching $24,309

Hit on defenseless player $24,309

Roughing the passer $18,231

Excessive profanity $12,154

Unsportsmanlike conduct $12,154

Taunting $9,115

Throwing ball into stands $6,076

Personal messages on uniform $6,076

On-field commercial logo violation Suspension or fine

Gang signing Suspension or fine


No two people would look at this list and prioritize the same way. But can’t we agree that 300-pound men committing an act that can hurt someone physically is far worse than an act hurting them emotionally?

Earlier this month, the Patriots’ LeGarrette Blount ripped Ndamukong Suh for being dirty, then was fined $18,231 (there’s that figure again) for ripping off Suh’s helmet during a tussle. Blount deserved to be fined, but the chances of hurting Suh were nil.

In Landry’s case, his touchdown celebration was double trouble. The league hit him with a second $24,309 for grabbing his crotch. At least Landry was somewhat off the hook because via an adjustment based on his weekly salary, the net value of the fine turned out to be $21,644.

But what about running back Damien Williams, who was fined $12,154 for his end-zone dance with Jay Ajayi?

“I understand what they’re trying to do and what they’re trying to say, but I feel like at the end of the day, if I’m trying to celebrate with my guys, my teammates, and not doing something just on my own, I feel like they should kind of chill just a little bit,” Williams said.

Football is entertainment. There’s a line to be drawn between players showing up opponents vs. fans and players celebrating as one. Isn’t that the one thing the “stadium experience” offers that 4K cannot?

So let’s rethink that fine schedule. Let’s worry a little more about players hurting one another.

As for worrying about the shield, let’s take Damien Williams’ advice.

Chill.

Matt Burke named defensive coordinator of Dolphins

How was Matt Moore cleared so quickly? UM’s expert explains

[Will Laremy Tunsil be moved to left tackle in 2017?]

[Gase, Tannenbaum, Grier growing into formidable personnel team]

[Get to know Matt Burke, Dolphins new DC]

Pittsburgh Steelers LB Bud Dupree fined $18,231 for hit on Miami Dolphins’ Matt Moore

Pittsburgh Steelers outside linebacker Bud Dupree (48) hits Miami Dolphins quarterback Matt Moore (8) during the first half of an AFC Wild Card NFL football game in Pittsburgh, Sunday, Jan. 8, 2017. Moore remained in the game. (AP Photo/Fred Vuich)
Pittsburgh Steelers outside linebacker Bud Dupree (48) hits Miami Dolphins quarterback Matt Moore (8) during the first half of an AFC Wild Card NFL football game in Pittsburgh, Sunday, Jan. 8, 2017. Moore remained in the game. (AP Photo/Fred Vuich)

In a move surprising no one, the NFL reportedly is fining Pittsburgh Steelers linebacker Bud Dupree $18,231 for his hit on Dolphins quarterback Matt Moore in Sunday’s wild-card game.

Dupree told ESPN, which first reported the fine, he likely would appeal.

Midway through the second quarter, Moore was rocked in the jaw by the crown of Dupree’s helmet. Although the hit elicited gasps throughout Heinz Field, Moore missed only one play before being cleared by doctors to return to play.

Moore, however, then turned the ball over three times during Miami’s 30-12 loss.

The NFL announced it is investigating to assure concussion protocol was followed when Moore was cleared to return to the game. If the Dolphins are found to be in violation of league policy, they could be fined or docked draft picks under an agreement between the NFL and the NFL Players Association that went into effect this season.

Moore’s agent, Lynn Lashbrook, said he’s confident protocol was followed.

How was Matt Moore cleared so quickly? UM’s expert explains

[Will Laremy Tunsil be moved to left tackle in 2017?]

[Gase, Tannenbaum, Grier growing into formidable personnel team]

[Get to know Matt Burke, the man who could be Dolphins new DC]