Miami Dolphins owner Stephen Ross pledges $1 million to hurricane relief

Stephen Ross  is making an important donation after Hurricane Irma. (Melanie Bell/PBDN)

OXNARD, Calif. — Miami Dolphins owner Stephen Ross pledged $1 million to immediate and long-term rebuilding efforts in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma.

“The devastation throughout Florida was heartbreaking, but I was inspired by the resilience and spirit of our state to help rebuild,” Ross said in a statement. “Our most heartfelt thoughts and prayers go out to those impacted by Hurricane Irma and we are committed to helping in long term recovery efforts.”

The organization is also helping to provide volunteers through the Miami Dolphins Special Teams powered by AARP Foundation. The volunteers are to be deployed in Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties.

In addition, the Dolphins have partnered with AARP Foundation on a dollar for dollar matching campaign, with 100 percent of the money raised going directly into the community. Created to support the victims of the hurricane, especially those who are low-income and age 50-plus, these donations collected through the disaster relief fund will impact those in need.

Lastly, the team will assess long-term damage and collaborate with local and regional community partners involved with critical relief and rebuilding efforts in Monroe and Collier counties along with the Florida Keys.

What’s next for Miami Dolphins after Hurricane Irma?

7 Miami Dolphins we can’t wait to see play next weekend against the Chargers

If Miami Dolphins struggle this season, tons of reasonable excuses

Miami Dolphins: Charles Harris is locked in and ‘ready to rock and roll’

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What’s next for Miami Dolphins after Hurricane Irma?

Miami Dolphins wide receiver Leonte Carroo (88) drops a pass during Miami Dolphins minicamp at Baptist Health Training Facility at Nova Southeastern University in Davie, Florida on June 14, 2017. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)

Owner Stephen Ross and the Miami Dolphins asked the NFL if it could move the Oct. 1 London game against the New Orleans Saints to Miami, but the league said no, according to a league source.

The Dolphins’ season-opener this weekend against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers was pushed back to Nov. 19 with Hurricane Irma bearing down on South Florida. And now, in a worst-case scenario, Miami could be on the road without a return to South Florida for three straight weeks.

Miami left South Florida in advance of Hurricane Irma and took players, coaches, staff and their families to Oxnard, Calif., where the team will meet on Tuesday and practice Wednesday.

The Dolphins hope to return to South Florida to practice in advance of their game at the New York Jets on Sept. 24. The Dolphins have arranged a contingency plan — practicing in West Virginia — if it is not possible to return to South Florida after the game, a source confirmed.

Miami is also assessing any damage at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens and the team’s practice facility in Davie, a source confirmed. There was tornado activity in the vicinity of the stadium, and so a proper assessment must take place.

The Dolphins are scheduled to play at the Los Angeles Rams on Sunday in Carson, Calif., followed by the Jets and the Saints in London, a brutal stretch. Miami is not scheduled to play again at Hard Rock Stadium until Oct. 8 against the Tennessee Titans.

>>Hurricane Irma: Follow the latest headlines

>>Hurricane Irma: Download the PostNOW app and stay connected during the storm

7 Miami Dolphins we can’t wait to see play next weekend against the Chargers

Hurricane Irma has us all on edge.

There are some things bigger than even the NFL. And the safety of the residents of South Florida is clearly one of them.

>>Hurricane Irma: Get the latest news and information on the storm

While we wait to see the exact track Irma takes, many Dolphins players, coaches and staff members have already landed in California to begin preparations for the Los Angeles Chargers. Here are seven Dolphins we can’t wait to see take the field at StubHub Center in Carson, Calif., next weekend:

1) Jay Cutler – Cutler and coach Adam Gase felt they were ready for the season to open at home against the Tampa Bay Bucs. We suppose an extra week of studying and practice can’t hurt. Cutler has shown excellent arm strength and a willingness to take chances. How patient will he be when the lights are brighter? Cutler figures to see a fair share of 1-on-1 downfield opportunities against the Chargers.

2) DeVante Parker – Parker has been utterly dominant in organized team activities, training camp and the preseason. There is every reason to believe Parker will be Cutler’s favorite target. The Chargers have decent corners but nobody than should be able to beat Parker downfield 1-on-1. Parker led Miami with eight targets and 103 receiving yards at the Chargers last season. This season opener is an opportunity for Parker to set the tone for an entire season. Is he really ready to blossom into an NFL star?

3) Charles Harris – It was a quiet preseason for the rookie defensive end, after some impressive showings without pads. It may take some time for the underweight Harris to learn some of the savvy tricks that, for example, have allowed veteran Cam Wake to overcome his lack of size. Chargers quarterback Philip Rivers has been under pressure pretty much most of the time, for years. After going the entire preseason with a sack, Harris should have a decent shot at his first career sack in his debut.

4) Lawrence Timmons – Timmons seems to have enough left in the tank to help Miami address some run defense shenanigans. Timmons plays tough and without fear and could also be a weapon for defensive coordinator Matt Burke on run and pass blitzes. The loss of rookie middle linebacker Raekwon McMillan for the season only amplifies the importance of Timmons, especially when facing a back as talented as Melvin Gordon. The Chargers turned it over a ton last season. And Miami has an emphasis on increased turnovers, something Timmons can impact.

5) Ja’Wuan James – Ja’Wuan, block Joey Bosa. James has been battling through a shoulder injury and as he manages the pain he hopes his performance against powerful speed rushers like Bosa (10.5 sacks as a rookie) is not diminished. The Chargers will bring Bosa and Melvin Ingram (one sack vs. Miami last season) from the edges, so how James and Laremy Tunsil handle those two will be critical. The Dolphins believe James has more to offer than he’s shown.

6) Jay Ajayi – Ajayi averaged 4.2 yards on 19 carries against the Chargers last season. The Dolphins want a more consistent overall rushing attack this season. Ajayi, who had an excellent camp, wants to be more involved in the passing game. Ajayi’ motivation would figure to be that three 200-yard rushing games last season were not a fluke. The presence of center Mike Pouncey in this game should be a big positive. Pouncey’s final game last season was against the Chargers.

7) Rey Maualuga – By the time Maualuga takes the field at Los Angeles, he will have had four weeks to prepare. If there was any question that Maualuga would be ready to play against Tampa, that concern should be alleviated by an extra week of conditioning. Expect Mike Hull and Rey Maualuga to split 30-40 reps at the start of the season. Miami is hoping Maualuga can provide a downhill, thumping presence and can be inserted into the game in those moments (they were all too common in 2016) when an opposing running back is trampling them behind a gashing offensive line.

Miami Dolphins’ Leonte Carroo recalls impact of Hurricane Sandy

Leonte Carroo has been through at least one Superstorm in his young life. (Getty Images)

DAVIE — Miami Dolphins wide receiver Leonte Carroo was directly affected by Hurricane Sandy in 2012, a storm that did severe damage to New York and New Jersey, where he lived.

Carroo was a wide receiver at Rutgers in New Jersey.

“It was a pretty horrific hurricane,” Carroo recalled. “A lot of wind. A lot of rain. It really affected New Jersey. It was the first time New Jersey experienced anything like that. It was a pretty sad event.”

Carroo said his parents’ home sustained damage. A neighbor had a tree fall on their home. Nobody in his neighborhood had power for a week. The Rutgers dorms didn’t have power for a week. The Rutgers buildings didn’t have power.

The players missed four days of practice, and had to find a creative way to work out.

Carroo recalled the players lifted weights in a room with no power, lit by lamps running off generators.

Hurricane Sandy was the deadliest and most destructive storm of 2012.

New York and the surrounding metropolitan area sustained significant flooding.

Carroo recalled that the Rutgers players, despite many having damage to their own homes, visited displaced residents in shelters.

“We hung out with these little kids at a gymnasium,” Carroo said. “We hung out with them for a few days. Just play video games and basketball with them. Some football. They really appreciated it. Some of those areas were really badly damaged.”

Carroo wasn’t sure what he was in for with Hurricane Irma.

A few lockers away, Dolphins wide receiver Malcolm Lewis, a standout at the University of Miami whose family lives in Miami Gardens, said he wasn’t worried.

“We don’t leave,” Lewis said. “We board up and ride it out.”

Said Carroo: “Right now I have no idea what the hurricane is going to be like but I’m up on the fourth floor so I should be all right. I’m just praying for those who don’t have a place to stay.”

If Miami Dolphins struggle this season, tons of reasonable excuses

Breaking: NFL moves Miami Dolphins’ game vs. Tampa Bay Buccaneers to Nov. 19

Miami Dolphins LB Mike Hull fighting to keep hold on starting spot

Miami Dolphins: Charles Harris is locked in and ‘ready to rock and roll’

If Miami Dolphins struggle this season, tons of reasonable excuses

This Sept. 5, 2017 satellite image provided by NASA shows Hurricane Irma in the Caribbean. Irma roared into the Caribbean with record force early Wednesday, its winds shaking homes and flooding buildings on a chain of small islands along a path toward Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Cuba and a possible direct hit on South Florida. (NASA via AP)

DAVIE — When Adam Gase’s news conference opened on Tuesday afternoon, he was asked 18 consecutive questions about Hurricane Irma.

Gase didn’t have any answers. And of course, that was not his fault.

Gase isn’t going to want to hear this, but if the Miami Dolphins win four or five or six games this season, it’s going to be said and written that it wasn’t Gase’s fault.

Oh, there may be some blame about a decision to punt instead of going for it on fourth down, or about why Gase started a certain journeyman guard over another, but before his second season has even kicked off, Gase has been dealt a series of truly unlucky hands.

Some thought it was unfair that the Dolphins opened last season on the road at Seattle and New England, two perennial juggernauts.

That was nothing compared to the series of body blows Gase has had to manage before this season.

A season-ending injury to starting quarterback Ryan Tannehill.

A season-ending injury to starting middle linebacker Raekwon McMillan.

A half-season injury to starting left guard Ted Larsen.

The Dolphins thought they were doing the right thing by asking the NFL to open the season at home, considering all the time and resources that have been put into picturesque Hard Rock Stadium.

Of course, Hurricane Irma had other ideas.

Of course, the Dolphins and Bucs would have preferred to play anywhere in Week 1, as opposed to delaying the game to their mutual bye week, forcing a schedule of 16 consecutive games.

The players in Miami’s locker room did not want that.

“Trust me, you don’t know what 16 straight weeks would do to your body,” one Dolphins veteran was telling a rookie who plays his position on Tuesday.

But that’s exactly what will happen for Miami, now forced to deal with perhaps one of the most difficult schedules in NFL history.

• Miami will play their first three games away from home — at Los Angeles, at New York and at London.

• In order to have a bye week in November, the Dolphins asked to play the week after London at home, which they’ll do. Of course, there is no longer a bye week in November.

• Miami will play only three of their first nine games in Miami Gardens.

• The Dolphins will also play two games in five days in October (a Sunday at Atlanta followed by a Thursday at home against the Jets).

Gase was able to steer the Dolphins through significant adversity in his first season, establishing confidence in the locker room and in the fan base with an unexpected 10 victories and a playoff appearance.

In 2016, Tannehill didn’t finish the season, nor did Mike Pouncey or Reshad Jones or Koa Misi or Byron Maxwell or Jordan Cameron or Jelani Jenkins.

Every team faces adversity. Every team loses at least a few key players to injury.

But all this is well above the mean.

Gase is a personable individual, capable of small talk with almost anyone of any background or with any job.

But it was clear on Tuesday that he was locked in on a season that will now not start as scheduled. Gase, like most coaches, is completely consumed by football.

“We’re going to keep preparing like we’re playing Sunday,” Gase said Tuesday. “Where and when, we really don’t care.”

It is safe to say Gase was not zoned in on The Weather Channel.

It is obviously of the utmost importance that the people of South Florida stay as safe as possible during what could be a potentially catastrophic natural disaster.

That is far, far more important than any football game or even season.

But Dolphins football is also important, not only to the players and coaches, but also to the South Florida community.

And so, it is our responsibility to also discuss how these off-field events may impact Miami’s season.

Gase has already exhibited strong leadership, confidence and management skills.

Once again, they’re about to be tested to the extreme.

Breaking: NFL moves Miami Dolphins’ game vs. Tampa Bay Buccaneers to Nov. 19

Miami Dolphins LB Mike Hull fighting to keep hold on starting spot

Miami Dolphins: Charles Harris is locked in and ‘ready to rock and roll’

 

Miami Dolphins LB Mike Hull fighting to keep hold on starting spot

Miami Dolphins linebacker Mike Hull at Hard Rock Stadium. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)

DAVIE — Rey Maualuga was sitting a few lockers away from Mike Hull this week, explaining, as any veteran would, how he wants to be the Miami Dolphins’ starting linebacker.

At another moment, the rookie who was supposed to start at middle linebacker, Raekwon McMillan, was crossing in front of Hull as he tried to retrieve some things from his locker. McMillan will miss the season with a torn anterior cruciate ligament.

It seems as tough and scrappy and hard-nosed as Hull is, as relentless as he is on special teams, there is skepticism about if Hull, 6-feet, 232 pounds, can be an effective starting linebacker in the NFL.

When you’re undrafted, that’s where the skepticism can start.

When you’re undersized, that’s where the skepticism can compound.

Hull has heard it all. He’s also thought a lot about opportunity. About how an injury can happy at any time. About how an opportunity to start can disappear at any time.

And so if Hull starts in the season opener against Tampa Bay, which certainly is possible, he plans to put every ounce of effort into not only his special teams reps, but his reps in the middle of Miami’s defense.

“Every time I step on the field I know I have to make the most of the opportunity,” Hull said Tuesday. “Nothing really come easy for me. I always have to prove someone or something wrong, every time I’m out there. So I just want to keep doing that.”

Hull realized that not only had he made the Dolphins, but was going to be a central cast member, when he actually held out of the preseason finale at Minnesota. There was Mike Hull, in sweats and sneakers. Because the coach didn’t want to risk him to injury.

“I knew it was a good sign at that point, just because of the other guys that were being held out,” Hull said. “So at that point, it was just prepare for Tampa Bay and get ready to have a great game this week. It was definitely a different experience, not being in full uniform.”

Hull barely played in the preseason, but it was by design.

In the past two preseasons, he was among the team’s leading tacklers.

“I think I played well, given the opportunities that I had,” Hull said. “I think this year, my reps were way down compared to my reps the last two years. Which is a little weird for me. Just because I’m a guy that’s used to being out there all the time, especially on special teams. I think I had only one snap on all four special teams this year. So it was a different experience. But I feel comfortable going in and I feel healthy which is the main thing.”

What does Hull believe his role will be in the season opener?

“Just play on defense in certain personnel groupings when they need me, just like I have been all preseason,” he said. “And being a core special-teamer as well. Core special-teamer is why I’ve always been here. Playing on defense whenever my number is called that’s how you stick in this league.”

Miami Dolphins: Charles Harris is locked in and ‘ready to rock and roll’

What Miami Dolphins coach Adam Gase said Tuesday

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Five undrafted Miami Dolphins rookies share joyous tales of how they beat the odds

Miami Dolphins LB Rey Maualuga reaches target weight

Miami Dolphins practice squad includes Brandon Doughty, De’Veon Smith

Miami Dolphins: Charles Harris is locked in and ‘ready to rock and roll’

What will Charles Harris do now, when it counts? (Allen Eyestone/The Post)

DAVIE — Charles Harris was sitting at his stall in the Miami Dolphins locker room, appearing completely locked in, completely laser-focused and completely serious.

It’s his first NFL game week (at least Harris hopes, pending Hurricane Irma) and he says he’s ready.

“I’ve been getting anxious all week,” Harris said Tuesday. “I’ve really be keeping quiet. Just doing my plays. Doing what I’ve got to do. Doing my job. But yeah, now that it does count, I think everyone has more emotion toward the game, more emotion toward practice. It’s time to just put it all on film, when the day comes.”

Harris had two tackles, and no sacks, in four preseason games.

Harris is a first-round draft choice paid to sack the quarterback, and he knows expectations are high.

“I would just say it was all building blocks,” Harris said of the preseason. “Each day I got better in each area of the game. Got better in each phase. And I feel like it’s a good time to put everything together. It’s time for me to put it together on the field and in film study. I think the preseason was great developmentally. But it’s time to rock and roll.”

Harris said when he was in elementary school, he experienced a tornado warning.

But he has never experienced an actual tornado or hurricane, like the one threatening his first professional game.

“We have to do what we have to do to get prepared,” Harris said. “We were hoping to play Thursday. I know a lot of the guys heard the rumor we might be able to play Thursday. We’re prepared. We’ve been going hard all week. Everybody is anxious to get on the field. So if they delay it to the bye week or delay it to Sunday at another place, it doesn’t matter. (Defensive coordinator Matt) Burke said our identity is going to be, ‘Put the ball down and we’re ready to play.’ So that’s what it’s going to be. That’s the mindset everybody has.”

Harris had a few up and down moments in the preseason but his confidence has not been completely rattled.

He seems comforted by the presence of talented veterans Cam Wake, Ndamukong Suh, William Hayes and Andre Branch.

 

“I think we can do unknown things,” Harris said. “I feel like (the defensive line) can go as far as we want to take the team. I feel like everybody is ready to lean on us from a defensive standpoint. Everybody is going to depend on us to bring the tempo and set the tempo each and every game. I feel like we are the stakeholders in the game, and everything is going to rely on us.”

What Miami Dolphins coach Adam Gase said Tuesday

Cody Parkey of Jupiter kicks way into Miami Dolphins dream

Five undrafted Miami Dolphins rookies share joyous tales of how they beat the odds

Miami Dolphins LB Rey Maualuga reaches target weight

Why the Miami Dolphins added new kicker Cody Parkey

Miami Dolphins: Adam Gase announces starting offensive lineman

Miami Dolphins: Who got what jersey numbers?

Miami Dolphins practice squad includes Brandon Doughty, De’Veon Smith

 The Daily Dolphin Live: Join the Conversation
  Join our reporters for a special evening as they talk NFL with Dolphins Pro Bowl Guard Jermon Bushrod, two-time Super Bowl champion Bob Kuechenberg and former Dolphins Pro Bowl linebacker Kim Bokamperon Tuesday, Sept. 5 at 6:30 p.m. at Bokamper’s Fort Lauderdale. The event is free to the first 100 people and will include raffles, light bites and drinks.

 

What Miami Dolphins coach Adam Gase said Tuesday

Miami Dolphins coach Adam Gase. (Photo by Joel Auerbach/Getty Images)

Here is some of what Miami Dolphins coach Adam Gase said Tuesday:

• Adam Gase does not have an update. There is not a change to the practice schedule.

• Miami is practicing as though they are playing this week. But Gase is just waiting.

• The league and teams are having ongoing discussions.

• Whatever they tell us to do they will do.

• This is the second time Miami has practiced on Monday-Tuesday-Wednesday and second time the team has been worried about a hurricane.

• Cordrea Tankersley has size and speed and can be physical at the line of scrimmage. The smaller, quicker guys are the guys he needs to do extra work on.

• The Dolphins have to work through when or if it makes sense to have a corner like Xavien Howard chase a talented wide receiver around on a matchup basis.

• The Dolphins would like Ndamukong Suh to have some 1-on-1 matchups and also limit Tampa Bay’s 1-on-1 matchups for defensive tackle Gerald McCoy.

• Xavien Howard believes he can play at a high level all year. We want to keep him healthy and keep him going.

• The undrafted guys are playing for their lives. Nothing is given to them. They are fighters.

• T.J. McDonald has shown that he is a great fit both on and off the field. Hence, the extension.

• Gase hasn’t been through anything like that so he doesn’t know what to expect. Last year was the closest he has dealt with but that didn’t end up too badly. He just wants to make sure his players and their families know what they’re doing.

Cody Parkey of Jupiter kicks way into Miami Dolphins dream

Five undrafted Miami Dolphins rookies share joyous tales of how they beat the odds

Miami Dolphins LB Rey Maualuga reaches target weight

Why the Miami Dolphins added new kicker Cody Parkey

Miami Dolphins: Adam Gase announces starting offensive lineman

Miami Dolphins: Who got what jersey numbers?

Miami Dolphins practice squad includes Brandon Doughty, De’Veon Smith

 Join our reporters for a special evening as they talk NFL with Dolphins Pro Bowl Guard Jermon Bushrod, two-time Super Bowl champion Bob Kuechenberg and former Dolphins Pro Bowl linebacker Kim Bokamperon Tuesday, Sept. 5 at 6:30 p.m. at Bokamper’s Fort Lauderdale. The event is free to the first 100 people and will include raffles, light bites and drinks.

Cody Parkey of Jupiter kicks way into Miami Dolphins dream

Cody Parkey is 5-for-5 in his career from 50 yards and beyond. (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)

DAVIE — The man kicking for the Cleveland Browns last season had his cell phone set to provide notifications of the Miami Dolphins scores.

Yes, Cody Parkey of Jupiter is a Miami Dolphins fan.

“To this day, I still get the updates of the halftime scores and stuff, so after the games on my phone I’m like ‘Oh, the Dolphins won.’” Parkey said Monday. “So it’s pretty neat.”

Oh, and, of Monday, Parkey is the Miami Dolphins kicker.

“My agent called me and told me that I got picked up off waivers by the Dolphins,” Parkey recalled. “Obviously, I was pretty stoked; and then (executive vice president) Mike (Tannenbaum) called me and told me they were bringing me in and I was their guy and that he had a lot of confidence in me, so it was really good news.”

Parkey and his family attended about one Dolphins game a year when he was growing up.

Parkey recalled he had a poster with a Dolphins logo on the wall of his childhood bedroom.

“Pretty crazy,” Parkey said. “I went from having a really good camp in Cleveland to getting cut, unfortunately; but it couldn’t have been a better spot for me to land (than) here. I’m close to home and I grew up a Dolphins fan, so this is pretty awesome. I get to kick in some warm weather, which is also good news.”

Parkey was a Pro Bowler in 2014 with Philadelphia and had solid seasons with the Browns in 2015 and ’16. But he missed three field goals in a loss at Miami.

Coach Adam Gase said that was a non-factor, obviously, in Miami’s decision.

“That was a pretty tough situation,” Parkey said. “I own it. I had a bad game; but I came back and had a strong season.”

Parkey said he could not have chosen a better desination.

“This is awesome,” he said. “This is incredible.”

Five undrafted Miami Dolphins rookies share joyous tales of how they beat the odds

Miami Dolphins LB Rey Maualuga reaches target weight

Why the Miami Dolphins added new kicker Cody Parkey

Miami Dolphins: Adam Gase announces starting offensive lineman

Miami Dolphins: Who got what jersey numbers?

Miami Dolphins practice squad includes Brandon Doughty, De’Veon Smith

 Join our reporters for a special evening as they talk NFL with Dolphins Pro Bowl Guard Jermon Bushrod, two-time Super Bowl champion Bob Kuechenberg and former Dolphins Pro Bowl linebacker Kim Bokamperon Tuesday, Sept. 5 at 6:30 p.m. at Bokamper’s Fort Lauderdale. The event is free to the first 100 people and will include raffles, light bites and drinks.

Miami Dolphins LB Rey Maualuga reaches target weight

Rey Maualuga can’t say if he’ll play in Miami’s opener. (Photo by Jared Wickerham/Getty Images)

DAVIE — When Rey Maualuga joined the Miami Dolphins, he indicated he needed to lose more than 10 pounds.

“I think I’m there,” Maualuga said of hitting his target weight on Monday. “Obviously it’s not that hard to shed weight in this humidity. We Samoans, tend to be be big-boned. It’s coming.”

Maualuga did not play in Miami’s preseason finale at Minnesota, in order to focus on conditioning. He feels ready to play in Sunday’s season-opener against Tampa Bay.

“I feel good,” Maualuga said. “I feel great. Keep doing what I need to do in order to get on that field. Obviously I can’t control what coaches say. Or how much he puts me out there. But I’m just going to keep preparing as if I am going to play. But at the end of the day it’s coaches’ decision whether I suit up or not.”

Maualuga said he did more in practice in Monday than he did in any day since his arrival.

Dolphins coach Adam Gase has said he envisions ramping up Maualuga’s snaps as the season progresses.

On Monday, when asked if the plan is to start Maualuga, Gase said: “We’ll practice today and kind of see how it goes.”

Maualuga was asked if he expects to start at some point.

“That’s everyone dream, obviously,” he said. “Everyone has high hopes for themselves. I have high hopes for myself. And you know eventually I would want to be. There is no ands, if or buts about it. But at the same time, this isn’t my team. I’m not the head coach. I’m going to continue to do my best to get on the field as quick as I can. And help out as best as I can.”

One wise decision Maualuga made was to not pay Brandon Watts for the #58.

Watts didn’t make the team and thus #58 was hanging in Maualuga’s locker on Monday.

“It didn’t cost me anything,” Maualuga said. “I knew eventually something was going to happen, whether I got 58 or I got another number. Obviously I wouldn’t have wanted to wait for another number. It was only a matter of time, whether I got a jersey or not. 72 was the only number available. And I would be the laughing stock of the locker room if I was wearing 72.”

Did Maualuga ever offer Watts cash?

“He said the number,” Maualuga said. “I had to wait. Eventually if (Watts) did make the team I was going to not be a punk about it and pay what he asked for. But at the end of the day everything worked out. I got 58.”

Why the Miami Dolphins added new kicker Cody Parkey

Miami Dolphins: Adam Gase announces starting offensive lineman

Miami Dolphins: Who got what jersey numbers?

Miami Dolphins practice squad includes Brandon Doughty, De’Veon Smith

 

 Join our reporters for a special evening as they talk NFL with Dolphins Pro Bowl Guard Jermon Bushrod, two-time Super Bowl champion Bob Kuechenberg and former Dolphins Pro Bowl linebacker Kim Bokamperon Tuesday, Sept. 5 at 6:30 p.m. at Bokamper’s Fort Lauderdale. The event is free to the first 100 people and will include raffles, light bites and drinks.